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Image via The New York Times
Image via The New York Times
A portion of an interactive map, published by the New York Times, that portrays Sanders' wins in green and Clinton's in blue.

While Hillary Clinton took home the win in the heated New York primary on April 19, trumping Brooklyn native and fellow Democratic presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders by more than 25 percent of the total vote (according to the most recent unofficial numbers from the city’s Board of Elections, which is still counting votes), some southern Brooklyn neighborhoods were certainly ‘feelin’ the Bern.’

According to an interactive map published by the New York Times that allows readers to see just how their neighborhood voted, Sanders scored big in ‘hoods like Bay Ridge, Dyker Heights, Bensonhurst (East and West) and Bath Beach.

Sanders secured 53.7 percent of the vote in Bay Ridge, where over 7,000 Democratic voters hit the polls, and 55.5 percent in Dyker Heights, where close to 2,000 Dems exercised their right to vote.

Over 5,500 Democrats turned out in Bensonhurst, where Sanders took home 52.6 percent on the eastern side, and 53.7 percent on the western side. While just over 1,000 voters turned out in Bath Beach, Sanders took home the win with just 74 votes over Clinton (coming in at 53.3 percent).

Meanwhile, Clinton secured Sunset Park (East and West), Sheepshead Bay, Park Slope-Gowanus, Windsor Terrace, Gravesend, and Seagate-Coney Island.

Over 7,000 Democrats turned out in Sunset Park, where Clinton snagged 52.3 percent on the eastern side, and 51.9 percent on the western side. She also scored 52 percent of the votes inSheepshead Bay (out of 4,323 total votes), 51.8 percent of the votes in Windsor Terrace (out of 5,324 total votes), and 53.1 percent of the votes in Gravesend (out of 1,766 total votes).

While the Democratic race was neck and neck in the majority of southern Brooklyn nabes, Clinton crushed Sanders in Park Slope-Gowanus, two hoods that saw a total of 17,660 voters (over 10,000 of them – 57.5 percent to be exact – standing with her). The same can be said forSeagate-Coney Island, where Clinton took home 63.7 percent of the vote (or, 1,581 votes to Sanders’ 899). She also had an easy victory in eastern Brooklyn (where, for example, she scored over 70 percent of the vote in both East New York and Brownsville), and in most of Flatbush(where she picked up 59.6 percent of over 14,000 votes), with the exception of a small segment in Ditmas Park, which Sanders carried.

On the other side of the aisle, a majority of south Brooklyn nabes opted for Republican candidate Donald Trump, who took the win with more than 60 percent of all New York votes.

Just over 2,500 Republican voters turned out in Bay Ridge, 69.2 percent of them voting Trump. Meanwhile, candidate John Kasich claimed 20 percent of the Bay Ridge votes, and Ted Cruz, just 10 percent.

Trump won by even more in ‘hoods like Dyker Heights (76.3 percent of just over 1,000 votes),Bensonhurst (77.9 percent on the eastern side and 76.5 percent on the western side), Bath Beach (78.6 percent) and Sheepshead Bay (78.6 percent). He also scored victories in Windsor Terrace (53.1 percent) and Sunset Park (54.1 percent on the eastern side and 62.5 percent on the western side).

The businessman-turned-hopeful politician collected over 80 percent of the votes in Seagate-Coney Island (scoring 259 votes compared to Cruz’s 33 and Kasich’s 26), and 81 percent inGravesend (snagging 425 votes to Cruz’s 51 and Kasich’s 43).

Still, Kasich and Cruz celebrated at least one Brooklyn win each.

Kasich, the Republican presidential hopeful from Ohio, edged out Trump in Park Slope-Gowanus, where he ended up with 46.3 percent of the vote (and a total of 273 votes to Trump’s 241). Meanwhile, Cruz, the Texas politician who scored just 75 votes in Park Slope-Gowanus, took home 56.6 percent of the vote in Borough Park.

In total, 924,330 Democrats and 107,446 Republicans cast ballots in the primary, citywide.

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